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Pawtributor
JennandRookie
Posts: 3
Registered: ‎09-12-2012

Aggressive Puppy

My puppy is a LhasaPoo and is 6 months old. For the most part he is a loving pup and definitely loving towards other people.  But he gets in these moods towards me where he is aggressive and nips and bites me. I say "NO" and he just growls, barks and bites me. After doing research, I believe he thinks he is the "Alpha" between me and him. I don't know how to handle this. Again, I say No, No Bite etc.. and all he does is bites my feet, arms, hands, legs etc and growls, barks and runs around. Can anyone help?

New Paw-ticipant
TopDog
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎10-04-2012

Get yourself a pair of leather work gloves and when the g...

Get yourself a pair of leather work gloves and when the growling or biting behavior begins, you might want to try pinning the dog into a submissive position... which means lying on their side and using your gloved hand to restrain the dog by applying a loose grip around the neck until the dog submits.  Don't let go too early, this might take 30 secs or a minute, then when he finally submits you need to praise him Good Dog, and slowly remove your grip on the neck allowing him to raise his head, but not get up.

 

Be ready to reapply the grip around the neck if he goes back into growling and biting.  Be firm and confident in your energy when doing this, just like when a child acts out and you respond quickly with firm yet appropriate level of discipline.  Do not yell at the dog or scream his name... Simply use a loud verbal noise like Heh Heh to get his attention.  You have to match his intensity with a slightly higher level of intensity, never weaker, or he will know you don't mean business.  Keep in mind, this might take several attempts before he gets the message, be persistent and consistent!

 

Good luck,

Michael

Best of Breed
Rebecca
Posts: 2,324
Registered: ‎03-19-2012

training

Hi JennaandRookie and welcome to Pet360

 

It is important to keep in mind that your puppy, is, well a puppy.  This is very typical behavior  of a puppy.  How old was your puppy when you got him?  Where did you get him - from a breeder, pet store, rescue?  His background can be very important in helping with training.

 

While it is important to set some rules early on, I do not advise grabbing him firmly on the neck or using ANY type of physical punishment.  This may work temporarily, but can cause him to be even more aggressive in the long term.  

 

There is a lot of talk about "alpha" and "dominance" and those terms are often very, very incorrectly applied to dogs.  I suggest you check out a great trainer's website, named Patricia McConnell and maybe even pick up one of her books.

 

Also, have you enrolled him in any puppy training classes yet?  That should be your first step - find a trainer in your area that uses positive reinforcement methods.

-Rebecca
(Retired) Community Engagement Manager, Pet360
Frisky Friend
Rainbow
Posts: 75
Registered: ‎10-09-2012

Help for aggressive puppy

You should only use positive reinforcement. Here is an article I hope you find it helpful. Good luck. :smileyhappy:
http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/DogAggression/

Pawtributor
Busyelf
Posts: 18
Registered: ‎09-15-2013

Re: Aggressive Puppy

If positive reenforcement does not work, you can work with a time-out. Most likely he means no harm, but does have to learn that it is not ok to bite you or growl at you. So if so far you have not gotten any results, put him in his crate, corner, bed, which ever you are using and tell him to stay there (you might have to enforce that by shutting the crate, tying the leash to the chair, etc.).

after a while the little cutie should learn that while playing is all fun, growling and biting is not. 

Good luck!

You can't safe them all, but don't let that stop you from trying.
Pawtributor
alex_gold
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎09-15-2013

I Am Having The Same Problem

Hi JennandRookie. I am having the same problem with my puppy. He turns 1 year old on December 20th, and he has already graduated two obediance training classes. I am still having this problem. I am starting to think that the problem isn't him, but me. Be sure not to get into your puppy's face when he gets agressive; I did that, and that was the worst thing I could have done. He still nips and bites at me at random times. I am probably going to seek out professional help because I have been trying to find a solution to this problem for months, and none have come my way. If you have any advice or have any questiond for me, please feel free to contact message me.

Frisky Friend
AzureSky
Posts: 91
Registered: ‎09-13-2013

Aggressive Puppy

My George was a biter when he was little. I had puncture wounds all over my arms and hands, even my feet. My doctor said it had to be stopped fast as I am diabetic. Infections can be a problem.

 

I got a cloth muzzle and wore leather gloves, then hunted around for advice online. The most helpful advice was from Dr Ian Dunbar who is a highly qualified Vet and behaviourist.

 

He said bite inhibition is extremely important. Using a combination of the muzzle and gloves I had geirge traind not to bite at all by 4 months old. This has paid dividends.

 

When he is at the vets, the worst thing he does is lightly touch with his teeth and that is under provocation. He hates having his temperature taken and his claws clipped,

 

http://http://www.siriuspup.com/pop_biting.html

 

http://http://www.siriuspup.com/about_history.html

 

I have recommended Dr Dunbar to people and his methods do work, even with older dogs.

Be like a dog, if you can't eat it or play with it, just pee on it and walk away.
happisburgh sea george close up 1.jpg
Pawtributor
alex_gold
Posts: 11
Registered: ‎09-15-2013

Professional Help

After a long search for the right approach for my dog, I found the perfect training group that specializes in helping dogs with aggression. Lorenzo's Dog Training Team has helped me immensely with my pup and now both of us are so much happier! He gets to go on play-dates and to dog parks and I don't have to worry about him attacking anybody! It is a fabulous feeling to have a canine companion that you can show off and share with other people! Mr. Bennett is one behaved pup!
Pawtributor
walkernotrunner
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎10-30-2013

aggresive pup!

Boy, can I relate to your dealing with an aggresive puppy!  My 9 month old Boxer girl is not 'fixed and won't be for future breeding, so I had to learn to adjust to a strong personality in her with my behavior being Alpha, and remaining Alpha.

I've also discovered Aifa incites play where I am supposed to show my dominance, and it's helped tons!  She's a periodic 'humper' and I absolutely do not tolerate any humping behavior on me or my personal things, which she has tried to push before as well. I make sure I am above her, then during 'rough' play where she'll push to see where that boundary line is with me, I gently push her down on her side, put most of my weight on her upper body (she's 63 pounds so I can comfortably), and then I stay there for a few moments, and will even nuzzle and play nip her neck, I've growled and barked back at her when she gets 'pushy' to remind her I'm the boss!

When I let her up, I give tons of praise and loves and using a high pitched tone with her gets my approval across. 

Just like small children, puppy's need to be shown periodically those boundaries that provide a family hierarchy, they like boundaries and rules and schedules! 

The only issue right now is that my Boxer girl loves children but will try to assert her dominance over THEM now, which I also DO NOT allow or tolerate.  She's so darn smart, I can see the wheels in her head turning as she processes what's allowed and what's not.  I can actually say to her now; "really?" when she starts to get pushy and she stops!

ifaball.jpg
Frisky Friend
Sallyintucson
Posts: 73
Registered: ‎04-02-2013

Snappy pup

Skip the gloves and take that pup to school! This is for several reasons: 1) so you become the head of the household 2) you can learn how to deal with your pup's naughty behaviors 3) so you can bond properly by teaching him tricks and how to walk nicely on a leash. Dog school is as much for the owner as it is for the dog. Skip the big box store "schools" which aren't worth the huge prices and go through the phone book (OK, computer) to compare prices. Your local Humane Society is a good place to start.

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